Beat Web Casinos

789betting

Bill Haywood’s strategy for beating Web casinos, as outlined in his 198 page book Beat Web Casinos: The Shrewd Player’s Guide to Internet Gambling, is simple: Play at casinos that offer the best bonuses, play enough of a low-risk game like baccarat or basic strategy blackjack to meet your bonus obligations, then cash out. He calls it “poaching deposit bonuses” and while casinos hate it, it’s the only real advantage an online player has.

For those unfamiliar with bonus poaching, I’ll give a quick example. Sign up at a casino that offers, say, a 15% sign-up bonus. Deposit $1000, and you receive a $150 bonus. Now, with $1150 in your account, play just enough blackjack or baccarat to meet the requirements of the promo without losing much of your stake. (You are usually required to wager one or two times the value of the bonus before you can cash it out). Then cash out — hopefully with your original deposit and a piece of the bonus in your pocket — and move to the next casino.

I’ve done this myself numerous times (see our reviews page) and it can work. One online gambler, after reading my review of Gaming Club, wrote to tell me how he registered for the casino’s $25 promotion, hit triple seven on the slots twice, won $1500, and had the money deposited into his account in four days. The player never even made a deposit. That’s bonus poaching at its best.

There’s really not much more to it, although Haywood beefs up his bonus section to include advice on keeping detailed logs and records, basic guidance on avoiding scam operations, and tips on camouflaging your play so you don’t get blacklisted. Indeed, his discussion on the shared blacklist of bonus poachers maintained by the Interactive Gaming Council is one of the more enlightening sections in the book.

Beyond the bonus strategy, Haywood offers a brief but succinct rundown of the legalities of 789betting gambling, plus information on some of the main software providers and Net resources, the arithmetic of gambling, basic blackjack strategy and gambling addiction.

Give Haywood credit for having the guts to call it like he sees it. In particular he takes many of the online gaming commissions and associations to task for working for the benefit of the casinos and not the players they claim to represent.

Haywood’s information is generally accurate, but he is quick to jump to conclusions. For example, Haywood repeatedly tells us not to play at Handa-Lopez casinos, such as the Grand Dominican. His reason? “I cannot tell you why because I cannot prove it. Trust me.” If Haywood has evidence of wrong-doing online gamblers need to hear about it. Let’s hope the facts come out in the next edition.

While his lists of Good and Bad casinos are generally sound, surprisingly, Haywood recommends playing at Golden Palace. Golden Palace has a long history of locking out the accounts of players suspected of bonus abuse, and many of these players used the very strategy described in his book.