Bola88 Trips in Your Hand in Omaha

 

 

Two of the most interesting hands I played at the World Poker Open in Mississippi involved trips in my hand while playing pot-limit Omaha high. This holding is, of course, a serious drawback to your chances of winning the pot. Normally, to ever get involved, you would need to have three aces or three kings on the button (most likely with a suited card with them), or be in the big blind in an unraised pot — or be a little bit crazy.

 

Can you win a pot on a drawout if you were never behind the entire time? Here is a hand that I played in an Omaha cash game in which I held the best hand throughout, yet felt as if I had drawn out to win the pot! I was on the button with aces, one of which was suited with the 8hearts. Everyone folded around to the player on my right, who opened with a raise. It seemed natural for me to reraise in order to knock out the blinds and limit the number of my opponents to one, as in Omaha, aces play much better against a single Bola88 opponent than multiple opponents. That applied even more strongly to my hand than usual, as I held three aces, a hand with which I would be absolutely terrified if facing more than one opponent. (If I get three aces in an Omaha game, I often muck them before the flop, but here, I was braver because of the way the betting had gone.) To my dismay, I not only failed to knock out both blinds, but my $100 reraise got reraised to $250 by one of the blinds. To my relief, the initial raiser on my right folded. Now, I had the choice of reraising the maximum, which would put me nearly all in, or trying to guess whether the flop helped my opponent when it came. There was, of course, no question that he would call if I reraised, as he was clearly pot-committed. I decided not to play any guessing games and popped him back, and he called.

 

The flop that came down looked like a miracle to me — A-K-9 with a two-flush. I had hit the case ace to give me quads. Of course, I could play only two of the three aces in my hand, this being Omaha, but top set is still a mighty fine holding even when the fourth card of the set is out of play. I bet my last $200. My opponent, who held two pair in his hand, kings and fives, had flopped second set, and of course called. When we showed our hands, he was thoroughly disgusted that I had hit a one-outer to have a higher set than his. The board paired nines on the turn — and I had helped my hand again. I won the pot when a blank came on the end.

 

Any Omaha player …